Marketing Plan is Doomed Relying On Social Media Alone

Social media is amazing, creative, fast, targeted and all the good things you want with any part of a comprehensive marketing plan. However, be very careful not to be seduced by a social media pitch as a panacea for all that ails your position in the market. If you want an effective marketing plan beware of the fast-paced, razzle-dazzle, audio-visual presentation featuring the major, and some far from major, social media blitzkrieg.

Marketing is most effective when it includes a comprehensive approach starting with research specific to the intended outcome of the plan. Know what you are seeking to achieve. Conduct a situational audit that includes the internal environment and its ability to manage new business, your capacity for response and growth management and organizational readiness to carry out the plan. An external audit is crucial to understand competitive forces, psycho-social purchasing behaviors of your targeted market, emerging trends that could fade you out and the overall strength of the economy. Remember bell-bottom jeans, beanie-babies, and K-cars? Know the external environment and that of your industry.

Avoid the impulsive agency practicing the READY-SHOOT-AIM approach on your dime and time. Instead, hire the marketing firm that knows your industry very well, such as Success Stories, Inc. in New York. All they do is healthcare with some not-for-profit and life science company work, too. I recommend a medical practice, senior living/senior care, urgent care, hospital systems, behavioral health provider and even a medical school stay away from advertising agencies that have tire, auto, shopping mall, gas stations, grocery stores, and attorneys as their prime clients. Why? Wouldn’t a mix of different clients be good? It would be great for the firm, but not for you as the assigned representative will learn your healthcare specialty on your clock!

A good marketing plan, based on audits, research and focus groups, is a comprehensive plan that utilizes all meaningful marketing tools. Too often, marketing is misrepresented. One might use advertising and marketing as interchangeable or public relations as marketing, or sales as the marketing plan.

Marketing is the all-inclusive, umbrella term that embraces sales, advertising, public relations, promotions, media relations, research and social media – the marketing mix.

I was invited by a developmentally disabled services company in the region to respond to an Request for a Proposal (RFP) for a comprehensive marketing plan. Truthfully, they desperately needed one. There are two clear leaders in the field with well-known names, great locations, signage, messaging, and rock-solid programming. They are the go-to providers. The RFP came from #3 in the market as determined by budget size and number of employees. Amongst several firms, my day came to present my proposal. It was a SoVeryBuffalo™ kind of day. The entrance was covered with snow, cigarette butts, slippery ice spots and an outside buzzer. I’m a rugged sort of fellow so I was fine, but I was forming impressions with each step. I gave a professional and thorough presentation, including that I have 35+ years in behavioral health with a list of VIP clients: DENT Neurologic Institute, Catholic Health, UBMD, UB Dental School, BryLin Hospitals, Rochester IPA, Fidelis, American Psychiatric Systems, maxIT, Excelsior Orthopaedics, Barnabas Health Systems along with three local references.

Weeks went by after my “thank you for the opportunity” letter with a P.S. that said, “I’m confident we will work very well together and achieve more than you expect.

No response. Call. No response. Sent a slightly funny email. No response. Finally spoke to an insider I know. She said, “Oh yeah, they went with a really cool and funny young group of people who just started a social media company. Someone didn’t call you?” Nope. No call. No letter. No business. They put all their marketing eggs in a social media investment.

Sad for me. Perplexed by their choice. I was told the new CEO thought they were cute and very modern.

The lesson of the story is, if you really want a marketing plan, don’t hire just a social media firm. It won’t work.

Two years later…they are still #3.

by Thomas P. McNulty

McNulty is a professor at Hilbert College where he teaches in the Masters of Public Administration program. He teaches Financial Resource Development and Marketing for Not For Profits-Healthcare Track. He has been consulting for healthcare, life science, not for profits and start-up companies since 1990. He’s held senior executive positions in managed care, hospitals, behavioral health, employee assistance programs and is a public presenter on a variety of healthcare management topics. He created Spotlight on Hope, Inc. – a 501 c 3 in 2005.

Advertisements

AFTER 16 YEARS

McNulty's Spotlight on Health

After 16 years, starting at CBS Radio, WECK-AM, JOY-FM and MIX 96, I am no longer at Townsquare Media and the switch for Spotlight on Health – a show I did there for 12 years- has been shut off. My sponsors covered the cost of the air time and a few ads we ran in local healthcare oriented newspapers around town. I was blessed by wonderful sponsors, some for all 12 years: DENT Neurologic Institute, Mercy Hospital, LifeCell Dx, Success Stories, Inc. and others: Hospice of Buffalo, UNYTS, People, Inc. Over that time period, I never took a dime for my time on air. For me, it was far more important to highlight critical health issues and feature local experts. The intended outcome was to secure current and accurate health, medical and behavioral health information from local experts. The show was produced by my not for profit, Spotlight on…

View original post 343 more words

Healthcare Marketing is More Critical Now Than Ever Before

Healthcare marketing can strengthen a provider’s foundation and community position during these rapidly changing times. For many, the last two years were about wait and see. They were about who would be in the Oval Office, what things would be untouched and how much would really change. Major trends in healthcare continue to emerge, they include:

  • People are living longer
  • Medical treatments are faster and more effective
  • Hospital beds are for short-term stays
  • Telemedicine works and is a hit with patients
  • Home health monitoring equipment is very cost-effective
  • The Life Sciences field is booming with solutions
  • Obesity is at epidemic levels leading to a myriad of complex medical conditions
  • Male infertility  is now a global birth rate problem
  • Mental illness is on the rise, but little attention is offered (Depression is the #1 reason employes call in sick)
  • Physicians are aging out and in short supply

    Is Anybody Out There?

    Is Anybody Out There?

All of these issues scream marketing opportunity. We know who is in the Oval Office and the Affordable Care Act is law. The number of people who signed up for “ObamaCare” did not meet expectations, but the rules are in effect. So, the wait and see is over.

Healthcare providers that are not re-building their organizations or practices are facing uncertain futures. Your core competencies are still your core deliverables, but how are you creating distinction in a world of consumer healthcare shoppers?

Marketing is not billboards, full-page newspaper ads, or TV commercials. Some of that might be appropriate, but most often it is not necessary to have a strong marketing position. Marketing is communication, messaging and getting people to think about the choices they are empowered to make.

I often say, marketing is storytelling. Who are you? What do you do? Who do you do it for? Where are you? Today, I add, why are you different? Creatively crafting the answers to these questions can give any healthcare organization a great start.

Creative marketing is very important, too. On a daily basis, we are exposed to an average of 2,500 marketing messages. How will you make your organization or practice stand out? If your logo doesn’t grab my eye, you loose. If your brochure is jammed with too much to read, you are lost. If your web site was done by your grandson, you don’t have a prayer.

Marketing does not have to break your bank. At Success Stories, Inc. our firm has been extremely sensitive to costs, but our rule is you must stick with the program. Start and stop efforts waste lots of money, time and can be very irritable to your target audience. The “Ready, Shoot, Aim” method is simply a rush to nowhere.

Public relations are very effective when done correctly. Remember when I mentioned storytelling? Public relations and working with the right media, including social media, gives you the opportunity to tell great stories. It is not something you can ask your office manager to do and your time is far more valuable. There are several nuances to making public and media relations work.

Today, the Internet offers lots of very creative ways to reach people, but you need a professional to help you navigate the web to find the right match for you.

Yes, there is so much more such as mobile apps, videos, hospitality training, patient and referral follow-up and new things everyday.

The critical message today is, if you are not actively involved in marketing, call us. If you are doing some marketing but know you need a boost, call us. The healthcare field is moving fast, so be ahead by being professionally prepared and well-recognized in your community.

thumbnail-3.aspxSuccess Stories, Inc. is a healthcare, life sciences and not for profit management and marketing firm since 1990.

SUCCESS STORIES, INC. – AN UPDATE ON WHAT WE OFFER YOU

IMG_0014_2

 

On-Site Executive of the Day
Business Plans
Marketing Plans or Action Plans
Communications Plans – Media, Public & Advertising and Strategies
Healthcare Writing Skills
Web and Java Development
Digital Marketing
Mobile App Development
Social Media Development
Strategic Planning
Customer Service Analysis & Solutions
Program Development
Interim Executive Position
New Location Scouting & Planning
Training: Management & Staff
Management and/or Board Revitalization
Small-Medium Business Turnaround
Financial Assessment & Solutions
Health Promotion

Call: (716) 481-4578 or email at tomsuccess@verizon.net

Find Us On Facebook, too!

Since 1990

Baby Baby Baby: Finally, Say Hello to LifeCellDx

Baby Baby Baby: Finally, Say Hello to LifeCellDx

The andrology world knows her work for more than 30+ years.
Studying male infertility has been her life’s work.
She fully understands the questions: Is it me? Or…Is it you?
She has presented her research and real proof all over the world.
She has helped thousands of couples make informed decisions.
She does Advanced Semen Analysis and can provide e-diagnostics through the Internet.
She has a patent for this unique process.
If you are struggling to have a baby, LifeCellDx is here to give you critical answers to the question, Is He Fertile?
Say hello to Dr. Lani Burkman, Founder and Chief Science Officer of LifeCellDx.

Many will contribute to this blog so you may have facts that lead you to informed decisions.

It is not your fault, rather, it is your opportunity to start with an Advanced Semen Analysis with results you will not find anywhere in the world.

Read on…

Change Your Behavior This Year, But Now Would Be Better!

 

Change Your Behavior As Soon As Possible

Change your behavior. My parents said it to me when I was a kid and it meant I was in trouble. I do the same with my children. B.F. Skinner revolutionized traditional psychotherapy by saying it. Judge Judy barks it out to her court-TV victims. In the corporate world, we’re told change or perish.

 When Monday’s alarm clock goes off, I hope you will change your behavior. Please avoid doing things the same way. Let the creature of habit in you get left behind as you turn off the lights to this year. Be different with the routine things you have to do to bring home a paycheck. We think our mission is to be consistent, predictable, and orderly. How ridiculous is that? What is consistent, predictable, and orderly about anything in our universe?

 Robert Kennedy once said, “ Progress is a nice word. But change is its motivator and change has enemies.” We instinctively avoid change. We fear it. We don’t understand why it is necessary. Change makes us angry. It creates anxiety. It makes us hide. Change makes us sweat. Good! Sweating is a cleansing process. Anxiety is energy. Fear stimulates imagination. Anger creates thrust.

 The emotional reactions we have to change must be set free to provide the passion we need for progress.

Find a significant time in history or an invention that was not engulfed in a passion to foster change. Think of the people you admire the most. Were they conformists or authors of a new vision? We are all different; therefore, we have the innate capacity for originality. Some of us harbor the capacity. We keep it hidden to avoid being noticed. Others challenge the line drawn in the sand and dare to step into the potentially lonely world of original thinking. It is those people who find life satisfying. They change their behavior while attempting to influence the behaviors of others.

I like people filled with ambition – people fueled with a desire to achieve more than they will. Leaders who invite change and embrace creative chaos are very attractive to people with a wealth of originality. Those who rule through meetings, e-mail and in the ivory tower are paragons of downsizing without a plan for growth. They are threatened by change and suspicious of innovators. Their bottom line is a number, not a soul.

Please change your behavior. Promise to explore new ideas and invite the whirlwind of originality to blow gale force warnings. Success is born of being different, fast, colorful, eye-catching, and passionate. When we think of very successful people, we think of people who changed their behaviors. In many cases, their decision to change influenced generations.

Please don’t do it the same way. Don’t fool yourself by re-packaging the same old junk and claim you’ve made a change either. Drive to work a different way. Take Wednesday off instead of Friday, see what you discover. Cancel committee meetings and just talk to people. Don’t “call a meeting” rather, invite thought, stimulate ideas. Change your company letterhead this coming year. Let it reflect the personality of your organization. Change your logo. There are not enough people in logos and far too many geometric shapes and confusing, deep thought symbols.

Please change what you say and how you say it. Examine your communication style. Does it really have “style”? Are you effective? Probably not, so please change your behavior. Why do executives have retreats? What are they retreating from? Create a place in your organization that stimulates new ideas, refreshes your employees and you can avoid those retreats no one remembers anyway.

 It isn’t easy to change, but it is necessary. As Nike says, ‘Just Do It.” Here are some ideas. Try one or two and you are on your way.

 Change your behavior, please !

• Get a massage.

• Take your child to breakfast – one on one special time together.

• Host a party for your staff.

• Send more Thank You notes.

• Volunteer at a children’s organization.

• Go to Jamaica, man.

• Put more people pictures in your cafeteria.

• Hire a Director of Corporate Chaos.

• Use all your vacation time.

• Eat chocolate pretzels.

• Take up photography.

• Learn a new language.

• Get a massage, I mean it!

• Send more holiday cards than you receive.

• Go easy on Chicken Wings this coming year.

• Take your staff to a baseball game.

• Write a letter to the editor.

• Hold fewer meetings.

• Get involved in your kid’s school.

• Turn off the TV.

• Learn Italian cooking.

• Value integrity.

• Let a consultant do it.

 

Promise yourself you’ll change your behavior, please.

 

Thomas P. McNulty is president of Success Stories, Inc. – a management and marketing consulting firm in Orchard Park. He can be reached at tomsuccess@verizon.net

Marketing for Not For Profits

Image

I’m concluding my second round of teaching a Masters level course in Public Administration at Hilbert College – a private, catholic college in western New York. It is a wonderful college with a tremendous focus on giving their students real skills, learning and avenues for creativity to better equip them for the ever-changing work world. I thoroughly enjoy the students. All of them are working full time and taking a full load to earn their MPA. My course is titled, Marketing and Public Relations for Not for Profits.

The course requires the students to develop a marketing plan for an area not for profit. As the professor, my task is to offer a true variety of NFP organizations. So, I write a few NFP names on a folded piece of paper and a team representative picks from the hat. It is a teacher’s dream to see the bewilderment on their faces as they read the selection’s name. They are befuddled. Some seem to have heard of the organization, but know very little. Others say things like, “is this a health NFP?” – as if they believe most NFPs are healthcare agencies doing work with people with HIV/AIDS, Alzheimer’s Disease, or mental illness.

Once they settle for a very brief moment, they look up at me as if to say, “what do you expect us to do with this?” or “I’m lost because I never even heard of these people.” As their tour guide for the next several weeks, I’m ready to begin their journey with some rules, reassurance, and describe where the ride will take them. At the Masters level, they must struggle, scratch, imagine, research, ask, discover and explore on their own. They must test their survival skills as they enter the NFP jungle like the cable TV show, Naked and Afraid. They are naked because they no longer have the comfort provided by having blankets of security called, “things I know.” They are afraid because this project is a team project, an oral presentation and a written marketing plan accounting for 80% of their final grade. Oh, by the way, I’m their last class before thesis defense and graduation. A poor grade in this class and they are devastated.

They begin as expected. Some try to negotiate by requesting another NFP. Others tell me they are not from western New York so they are at a terrible disadvantage. Finally, a few ask for a NFP in their field of work. Sorry, not today. Let’s move on.

After some interesting classes about the birth and evolution of NFPs of all types, sizes, fields of work, populations served and geography, we take a very serious look at the differences between NFPs and for profit organizations. By using examples, for the purpose of comparison, we talk about NIKE, Apple, American Red Cross, UNICEF, Catholic Health, American Cancer Society, NASCAR, Macy’s, BryLin Hospitals and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

The Business First’s Million Dollar Not For Profit issue comes out about a week before classes start. They are profoundly astonished at the salaries of NFP executives. Many students believed NFP work was a path to a low paying, long hours lifestyle. Several asked why managed care and hospital salaries were not posted, but they took some pretty good guesses at salary ranges. Most did not realize that managed care companies could be NFP. So, we continued to talk, learn and explore. Their assignment was to get engrossed in their chosen NFP as if they worked there. My dear friend, Aimee Gomlak, Vice President of Women Care at Catholic Health visits to talk about building a brand within a brand of a billion dollar operation.

At the appropriate time, I introduced them to the McNulty Model (yes, I created it based on 35+ years in marketing, management, NFP, media and consulting). It is intended to guide the marketing plan development process and I continue to tweek it as our world changes.

Here’s what they received:

McNulty Model

-NFP Marketing Plan Template-

 

1.) Introduction: What is Your Organization? What Does It Do?

 This is the initial exploration and discovery process. You cannot market what you do not know or fully understand. Get to know your organization from every angle. When they started? Why they were formed? How were they formed? What do they do today? What is their organizational structure? Once you have this information, write your Organizational Introduction.

2.) Plan’s Purpose

Your marketing plan must have a very defined purpose. Your intended focus is revealed and you take on 3-5 things you want to impact, grow, improve and more. This is the section you demonstrate your understanding of the organization’s best opportunities for success. You prove that by documenting in this section where they are now in real measureable terms. Example: 2010 # of physician referrals was 200 from 12 physicians. This plan will grow the referral base to 20 physicians yielding 350 referrals – 175 by June. Example: The number of media stories about our organization was limited to one television station. This plan will increase our electronic/print/Internet media reach to 15 outlets producing one story each.

Know where you are and where your marketing plan wants to take the organization.

 3.) Situation Audit: Your Inside World and The World You Cannot Control… But Must Monitor

 Simply put, what is your organization’s current operating situation? Focus on your attributes and your vulnerabilities. Look at things such as resources, geography, competitive edge, years of market position and anything that can impact your plan – positively or negatively. In this role, you are clearly an internal investigator and you must be boldly honest even if it stings. The truth must be known to plan.

External forces are things such as trends you could not have forecasted (sudden market drop, competitor merges with larger organization, etc.). Your audit highlights what’s going on now with strong reference to your immediate ability to course-correct your plan. In your industry, what are the climate forces that could alter your marketing action steps?

4.) Targets: All of Them You Wish to Reach

 In this section, the more specific you are the better your plan will be written and perform as a true tool for success. Avoid words such as, “the community, our region, schools, employees” and other catch-all categories. Instead, think about targets such as: couples with incomes above $100K within Buffalo city limits, male high school athletes in Catholic schools in Erie County, donors with a history of supporting violence reduction campaigns, corporations with a history of supporting outside events, etc. It is completely acceptable to have multiple targets or segments as long as you zero in on who they are in very measureable terms. In a healthcare NFP, instead of saying your target group is physicians, you might name the specialty likely to yield the best impact (pediatricians vs. rheumatologists).

 5.) Ready for Action: What Are You Planning to Do To Move The Marketplace? Your Targets?

 With each of the 3-5 things you want to achieve you can formulate 1-5 action steps that support each other. For instance, you could have a public relations action step that supports a sales campaign. A reporter interviews your CEO about what physicians should know about underage drinking rates in Erie County because your delivering a new screening tool to be used during annual physicals, sports physicals, etc. One plan can have multiple action steps. The steps must be in measureable terms so you know if it worked, should be adjusted or abandoned before any further resources are allocated.

All too often, action steps are not crafted with other staff input and this is a colossal mistake. To improve success, you must have staff buy-in, awareness and readiness. Your plan will fail if you build business you are not ready to manage. This is the McNulty Madness Factor – everyone is mad because your plan is working better than expected!

A good rule for Action is – make your plan measureable, doable and flexible.

 6.) Communication Integration

 Internal first. Never launch a message, press release, brochure, radio spot or billboard until all your employees, board members and volunteers know about it. In doing so, no one is caught off guard. Instead, you now have an army of marketing ambassadors. Sadly, this is often overlooked and McNulty Madness surfaces.

External. Do something every week to maintain consistency, fluidity, continuity and you will build your brand and tie it to your messaging. Keep in mind, what do your target audiences want to hear and where are they likely to hear it? Write newsworthy press releases and remember TV and Internet are visual media. Photography boosts a print story. Social media is a delicate, but effective channel. You can’t put a recipe on a billboard!

Integration: Make communication messages that integrate with headline news, trends, budget cuts, job market, economy, and family dynamics – Be Creative!

 7.) Strategies Steps

How will you unveil the plan to get it going? Who is helping? Have you planned out the year? Use of resources? Creative stretching of the dollar? Cross promotion with a partner? Corporate adoption of your event, cause, building, billboard and more. Use of consumers, graduates, artists…Be Creative!

8.) Tactics to Foster Buy-In Leading to a Relationship Development and Sustainability

 How will you connect your idea to the greater good? Your target audience? How will you create new relationships? Volunteer succession planning? Generational loyalty?

Example: Donor birthday cards, discounts from merchants, sticker on the car, lapel pin or building generational loyalty from birth.

9.) Resources: If You Got Them, Great! If Not, What Now?

 Resources are more than money in a budget. Volunteers, supplies, barter, board members, extended committee members, tie-in promotions, building space, free parking, Internet/social media, apps, etc. Use them all in creative, cost-effective, measurable ways and keep good records. Example: How many volunteers did we use for…?

Budget building is similar to shopping. How much do you have vs. how much things cost? The critical issue in building your budget is to build your “resource checklist” or line items. Typical costs in marketing budgets could include staff (but check to see if staffing is in another organizational budget), printing, equipment, advertising (by type: billboard, newspaper, etc.), promotions, mileage, event fees,  rentals, speaker fees, postage, entertainment (taking a reporter to lunch), designer, and other unique items. When putting a budget together, use bids, quotes and more from potential vendors. “How much would 1,000 12 oz, two-color coffee mugs cost?” “If I buy 4 quarter page ads for the year, what rate discount does my NFP get?” “If I put your logo on my brochure, what discount might you give me for 5,000 #10-size, double-sided, four-color brochures?”

10.) Begin, Check-In, Adjust, Keep Going

 Once you’ve started, you are on the go. Use your staff/board/volunteer/CEO meetings to “check-in” to see if you are on schedule. Is it working? Impediments? External factors requiring adjustment? Got more money or got cut mid-year. Who is a real champion and who is a disappointment? Will training come in to play? Did a new competitor come to town? Weather?

 11.) Celebrate Your Successes – With Everyone!

This is very important because it involves pride in ownership. Just as you’ll be held accountable when things go wrong, you must celebrate accomplishments. It is vital to your efforts and future plans that you spread the “well-done” and “thank you” messages around generously. No doubt, those same folks will be ready to help you again.

McNulty Model is a Success Stories, Inc. Copyright 2011 All Rights Reserved. Reprinted with permission of the author at tomsuccess@verizon.net

 While the classes continued, I could see their growth because they were embracing the concepts and their explorations led to discoveries that led to opportunities and a plan for impact. As you might imagine, as they did their research their information started plugging in to the McNulty Model rather smoothly. As anxiety shifted to enthusiasm, their creative energies emerged and their boundary restrictions were broken.

As a professor, it is very rewarding to see the transformation from admitted ignorance and stress move to self-fulfillment and pride in one’s accomplishment. Several students stated that struggling and being challenged to dig deeper to get what they needed facilitated a more engrained learning. They felt they had a tool box to be able to make their own marketing plan one day. My non-marketing students know how critical marketing is in NFPs and they understand how marketing integrates very well in to an organizational strategy. For me, that was success!

I’m available to teach your NFP staff on site if you are interested in creating a stronger marketing-driven organization. In today’s economy and strain for limited dollars, a solid marketing plan is an agency survival plan, too!

Thomas P. McNulty, President

###

McNulty Creates Totally Psych’d To Inspire, Create and Motivate Audiences and Individuals

ImageAs the founder of Success Stories, Inc. – a healthcare management consulting firm, I created a service called Totally Psych’d. With 35+ years in healthcare and as a consultant, I have been an advisor in a variety of different ways. Out of graduate school at Florida State University, I was a therapist at a private psychiatric hospital and later a counselor for teens with serious alcohol and drug addiction. As a professional consultant since 1990, I have worked with start up companies as well as the large healthcare corporations. In this field you find yourself attending many presentations, speeches and experts at podiums. Additionally, I’ve worked with young people trying to carve out a career path and many 50+-something friends who have suddenly been displaced. What I came to realize and witness were common themes of lost inspiration, motivation, innovation and a confused sense of self. No podium speaker is going to turn that around in an hour.

Totally Psych’d, as presented on the Success Stories, Inc. web site is not a speakers bureau; rather, it is a well-crafted presentation to targeted audiences designed to help others find their passion, their personal inventory of skills and a path to reinvention. We’ve worked very purposefully to gather a dozen (so far) theatrical, skilled and captivating presenters who can get their audience “totally psych’d” toward personal or community action. “Imagine a group of high school seniors about to embark on a college path without any strong insight into what they might do well and enjoy. We all know the stories of students who have switched majors and ended up taking six years to graduate – some with lots of debt and very anxious parents. You’ve got to roll out of bed in the morning loving what you do. Today, happiness seems to be the missing ingredient in our daily experiences. Our target gatherings might be college freshman, a stale management team, a bored board of directors, and a group of dreamers looking for a push or those recently fired or pink-slipped on a Friday by email. Too many good people don’t know how to get emotionally and professionally jump started. They are fearful of their future or are oblivious regarding their self-worth or market-value. Sadly, too many ignore the things they would love to do. I often ask, “if you could start fresh, what would you love to do?” Many say, “start my own business, others say become a carpenter, have my own radio show, become a chef, be a teacher and so on. I say back to them, “why not now? Let’s look at that and create-motivate-inspire a plan. We have to help folks snap out of the doldrums, give themselves credit for what they know and match it with a fire in the belly to go do it. For younger people, it might be guiding their passion and energy, mentoring them and motivate them to follow a path to a positive outcome – learning with every bump and bruise. So many parents ask me to sit with their kids and help them discover who they are and what they can be. I thrive on their sense of adventure, but I work to shape a plan. As an adjunct professor, I watch and listen to the hunger pains so many young people have as they graze at the cafeteria line of life’s choices. They are smart, but coddled. They are skilled, but don’t have a toolbox. We all know the kids I’m talking about. Enter Totally Psych’d.

Presentations are inspirational and entertaining. They can be interactive and are always dramatically theatrical. We are here to fire people up, not do a PowerPoint, give them handouts and watch them forget what they heard by the time they hit the door. We don’t have people looking at their watches, instead they are laughing, crying, getting ideas and you can see the expressions on their faces. It is the feedback actors get when they do live theater. Totally Psych’d match a presenter to the audience. Most presentations are 90-minutes and the fee is a flat and firm $1,500. According to McNulty, the single fee structure is market sensitive and avoids getting bogged down with clients and presenters trying to negotiate. Let’s just get on with the show!!

I created Success Stories, Inc. in 1990. I never thought I’d do radio, but I started in 1995 and host a weekly health talk radio program, Spotlight on Health on JOY-FM for 10 years. Since my start, I’ve done 800+ shows. I was lucky to receive storytelling training as a Fellow in the Fellows Action Network of the Health Foundation of Western and Central New York. I am a Leadership Buffalo graduate, Class of 2001. I am a photographer and I incorporate photography in to some of my Totally Psych’d presentations. As Rod Stewart wrote, “Every Picture Tells a Story.”

The service is booking dates for the remainder of 2014 and into the first half of 2014. To learn more, visit http://www.successstoriesinc.net and click on the page or Totally Psych’d on Facebook. Call  me at (716) 481-4578 to book a presentation.

Totally Psych’d is a copyrighted service of Success Stories, Inc., a healthcare management consulting firm specializing in health, medical, behavioral health, start ups, healthcare hospitality/customer service and a wide variety of not for profits. Success Stories, Inc. is based in Orchard Park with operations in New York and Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Are you ready to get Totally Psych’d?